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Communication



Communication on the battlefield is key. Historically many allied tanks, at the beginning of the war, did not have radios fitted in them. The axis AFVs did, giving them a great tactical advantage on the battlefield. Efficient communication allows for the coordinated use of air and ground units by the unit commanders. It also improves your survivability.

Here are some basic tips to keep in mind when communicating with your fellow soldiers, using the text chat utility:
  • Do not flood the channel with useless chatter - it is distracting and serves no real purpose other than to annoy those around you. If you want to chat, use a separate channel, private chat, or go to a chat room.
  • Keep it short but descriptive. Here are some examples: "1 S-35 SE of town", "Cyy, EI north of your pos. 500 meters". Simply shouting EI without giving a location does not help anyone. Give a direction, number and distance.
  • Use the comms to coordinate attacks. Talk to your air units and have them bomb the AB before you rush it. The same can be applied to all units, coordination is the key to taking, and defending towns.
  • There is no such thing as too much communication - its the type of communication that matters.

Here are some tips for Voice communications:

  • When at all possible, use text chat.
  • Again, do not flood the channel with useless chatter - it is distracting and serves no real purpose other than to annoy those around you. Flooding the channel also drowns out any useful information that others may be trying to communicate. When trying to communicate important information over other radio chatter use the following "BREAK. BREAK. Cyy EI north of your position 500 meters."
  • Keep it short but descriptive. Here are some examples: "1 S-35 SE of town, 1000 meters", "Cyy, EI north of your pos. 500 meters". Simply shouting EI without giving a location does not help anyone. Give a direction, number and distance.
  • Do not try to talk over people - it ends up being a garbled mess at the other end.
  • Voice comms can be a valuable resource - use it whenever possible.

Here are some common shorthand abbreviations used in this game:

  • AB = Army Base
  • FB = Forward Base
  • CP = Capture Point (This is the whole town, not just one flag building)
  • N, S, E, W = North, South, East and West. These are also used for North East (NE), etc.
  • AT = Anti Tank gun
  • AI = Artificial Intelligence controlled defenses
  • EI = Enemy Infantry
  • EA = Enemy Air
  • ET = Enemy tanks




Knowing your Enemy



This is an under-rated, but valuable section. This not only means that you should know the strengths and weaknesses of the enemy units, but also means that you know the situation that you are entering. You should never wander blindly into a fight without having some knowledge of enemy numbers, placement, status of the target (contested), your supply situation, etc. Gather as much information as possible - it can only help you in the long run.

When entering a new area, you should always try to find out what is happening - talk to someone who has been there for a while, form a plan of attack, and assess the situation. Driving straight to a target is the fastest way to catch hot lead. Know the layout of the enemy AB, how many ABs in a town, the location of a FB, or which direction the enemy is attacking from.

Know all enemy unit's weaknesses - from the Char's grill, to slow traverse of the Matilda's turret. Information is a powerful thing, it allows you to always play to your strengths.



Know your Objective



Never enter combat without an objective. Indecision kills. Know what your objective is and take it. Once it is taken, identify another objective, and take it - rinse - repeat. This is not to say that you shouldn't change focus on the fly, but you must have a clear target when entering a battle.

As stated in the section above, know the target layout - location and layout of an AB (is it walled? large bunker? in which corner of the AB is the bunker?), the location of the enemy AI emplacements, the location of the FBs, or any other target.

Commanders should always communicate the ultimate objectives for the approaching action - this way there can be no misunderstandings.



Coordination with Command



Coordination with command. At some point you will be involved in an action where multiple commanders (air, infantry, and armor) will be directing an attack. This will be complicated by the fact that there are multiple units (such as TOT, 31st) who have similar command structures. Each group should always make a concerted effort to coordinate with the High Command, instead of having each squad going off in different directions.

Each individual should be in contact with the officer in charge. Upon entering the game, you should immediately identify yourself to the officer in charge, find out the situation, find out what unit type is needed, and spawn in. If no one has command when you arrive, take it upon yourself to assume the role- with the understanding that when a superior officer arrives command will be transferred. This being said, no one should take command without knowing the full situation. A good rule of thumb is to spend 15-20 minutes in theater to acclimatize yourself to the situation before taking command.

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